Losing and Releasing

Lawyers talk a lot about wanting to win cases and not wanting to lose them.  It's something that seems pretty standard for anyone involved in trial work.  "Did you win your case?" is a common question in both social settings and at the office.  But the wording around this issue isn't great.  As we are told ad... Continue Reading →

Next Time, Use A Knife

I recently tried a case in which a defendant really screwed himself over by using a gun.  He broke up with his girlfriend and confronted her when she brought another man to pick up her stuff from his house.  The boyfriend shot several times at the man, causing him serious injury.  Because he used a gun... Continue Reading →

Meet the Truth

When you’re nice to people, they give you attempted murder cases.  That’s what I found out when a more senior DA got transferred and specifically asked that a case be assigned to me.  Normally, someone with my experience level would not try an attempted murder.  It was her vote of confidence that let me cut... Continue Reading →

A Bad Deal

There didn’t seem to be anything out of the ordinary when we first looked at the student interviewing with us for a law clerk position.  He a pale, skinny man in his late 20s at the top of his class at a local law school.  The interview was pretty normal until the very end, when our... Continue Reading →

Herding Witnesses

We argued motions in the morning on the day my second felony was supposed to begin.  I had two witnesses, both cops, subpoenaed to be in court at 10, to start out the case.  My civilian witness was taking a bus from 300 miles away, and wouldn’t arrive until the afternoon session.  But I had... Continue Reading →

Inside Baseball

I'm still reading Ghettoside by Jill Leovy, with a special eye to how the prosecutors handled the case.  Lead prosecutor Phil Sterling initially came to Leovy's attention when he advocated for the Tennelle case to be handled by LAPD's Robbery Homicide Division in a way that some considered to be arrogant.  But by the time he starts... Continue Reading →

Ghettoside

Jill Leovy's Ghettoside starts out with some pretty grim statistics.  Black men are only six percent of the nation's population but nearly 40% of those murdered.  They make up 12% of Los Angeles County's population but account for nearly half its homicide victims.  A total of 186,807 people died from homicides in the United States between... Continue Reading →

The Etymology of “Prosecutor”

The Latin “prosequi” meant “to follow after, accompany, chase, pursue, attack, assail, or abuse.”  It is composed of the prefix “pro” meaning “forward” and “sequi,” meaning “follow,” in the same sense as “sequel.”  In its most literal sense, prosequi means, “follow forward.”  In Latin, prosequi was usually used in two ways: literally to mean “follow... Continue Reading →

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑